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BLM: Why Education Is Essential

By Grace Broad



The only way we can achieve real, societal change is by taking ownership of our ignorance when it comes to racism. As a white woman speaking; it is clear to me that we have become so absorbed in our own bubble of privilege that we have made minimal effort to change our ways. Learning of the unconscious bias and racial inequality that takes place seems optional but as human beings, it is our responsibility to speak out as they happen. The dangerous custom of keeping quiet has meant that in Scotland, racism remains a taboo subject formed around opinion; rather than fact and responsibility. The global support for Black Lives Matter does not signal that this is the end of the conversation, but instead the beginning of real change. It is only by teaching ourselves of racism and its many forms that we can move forward and create an equal future for all. Education is the drive that will keep momentum going for Black Lives Matter.

You may ask, how can I educate myself on racism?

Watching the news is not the only way to learn about the world. We have so many sources at our fingertips to choose from: books, documentaries, podcasts, YouTube videos … the list is endless. Just remember to watch out for those fake news articles (predominantly shared on social media).

Contacting Your Local MP:

From a young age, we should discuss racism’s heavy impact on society. Scotland has played a huge role in racist history; forming its economy around the transatlantic slave trade. However, this history is still left untaught within our school curriculum. You can write to your local MP, addressing what you would like to change in schools. WriteToThem.com is a website that allows you to discover who the political representatives are in your area. Simply enter your UK postcode and WriteToThem will offer information surrounding your constituency and the contact details of your local MP. You can even contact your MP directly via the website.

Visit the WriteToThem, here: www.writetothem.com

Books:


Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

So You Want To Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo

Natives: Race and Class In The Ruins Of Empire by Akala

Back To Black: Retelling Black Radicalism For The 21st Century by Kehinde Andrews

This Book Is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons On How To Wake Up, Take Action And Do The Work by Tiffany Jewell

Hood Feminism: Notes From The Women White Feminists Forgot by Mikki Kendall

Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love And Liberation by Angel Kyodo Williams and Lama Rod Owens

Me and White Supremacy by Layla F. Saad

How To Be An Anti-Racist by Ibram X. Kendi

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, And You by Jason Reynolds Ibram X. Kendi


Talks / Discussions:


‘Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man’ Discussion series created by Emmanuel Acho – Available on YouTube

Akala: Full Address and Q&A At Oxford Union – Available on Youtube

Whiteness Psychosis With Kehinde Andrews: Russell Brand Podcast – Available on YouTube

‘Justice In America’ Podcast Series – Available on Spotify

Documentaries:


Black and Scottish – Available on BBC iPlayer

Scotland and The Klan – Available on YouTube

How Racist Are You? Jane Elliot’s Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise – Available on YouTube

13th – Available on Netflix

When They See Us – Available on Netflix

Who Killed Malcom X? – Available on Netflix

Time: The Kalief Browder Story – Available on Netflix

Hello, Privilege. It’s Me, Chelsea – Available on Netflix

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